“When They Say No, We Got To Go” The Country of Jordan Middle East Experience~ by Valerie Brown Cheers

Experience the Middle East (Without the Danger)

Many friends and family couldn’t believe we were heading to the middle east when I did. All you hear on the news is about how dangerous it is over there.  The reality? It is pretty dangerous over there, but NOT in Jordan.  Jordan is a bit of a safe haven from the violence going on in surrounding countries.

The demographic and economic transition that many developing countries, including Jordan, are undergoing is producing important changes in diet and lifestyle that greatly impact the development of chronic illness. The health behavior of adolescents in developing countries constitutes one of the most serious global challenges we face. The purpose of this study was to explore the wellness appraisal of Jordanian adolescents. It specifically describes the (i) self-care and health history pattern, (ii) to assess physical activity and nutrition appraisal, (iii) quality of life appraisal and (iv) school and outside activities appraisal. A self-administrated questionnaire collected the data from adolescent groups (boys and girls.).
http://heapro.oxfordjournals.org/content/24/2/130.full

To assess the current situation of sales and uses of herbal medicines in Jordan, more than 100 herbalists throughout the country were interviewed. The collected data included the types of herbs present in the market, the recommendations made by the herbalists in the treatment of ailments, the level of education and training of the herbalists, and miscellaneous observations. One hundred and fifty medicinal plant species were present in the local market. Based on their availability in the market and on the herbalists’ recommendations, 9 plant species were considered very common and 17 were considered as common. The survey indicated that most of the herbalists were not educated or trained in the field of herbal medicine except for their expertise gained from their predecessor, none were licensed for this particular purpose; several odd or unprecedented recommendations were passed to the customers. This survey emphasizes the necessity of proper handling of herbal medicines that requires proper regulations and licensing.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14611882

This was released in 2012

Jordan to release its Health and Wellness Destination Guide

Mar 18, 2012
The Medical Tourism Association in partnership with the Private Hospitals Association (PHA) announces the Jordan Health and Wellness Destination Guide.
Jordan’s forthcoming congress on medical tourism and wellness has been the result of decades of attention focused on the standards and quality of Jordanian healthcare services. For more information visit: http://imtcjordan.com
The author of the guide – President and founder of the Medical Tourism Association; Editor In Chief of Medical Tourism Magazine – Renée-Marie Stephano, said: “This book aims not only at consumers, but also the employers, insurance companies and other buyers of healthcare from all countries in the world.”
As part of our continuing Series on Medical Tourism, Health and Wellness, the Jordan Destination Guide is a “how-to” guide for individuals and employers seeking to learn about the health and wellness opportunities that exist throughout Jordan. Known for years for its excellence in healthcare, Jordan has continually increased its value proposition by promoting quality and international standards. Jordan’s strength lies in the high quality of its health care professionals within the medical services sector.

http://www.medicaltourismassociation.com/en/press/jordan-to-release-its-health-and-wellness-destinat.html

Your experience of Jordanian people is likely to be that they are, almost without exception, decent, honest, respectful and courteous. It seems only right that you should return some of that respect by showing a grasp of some basic aspects of Jordanian, Arab and Muslim culture.

If it’s possible to generalize, the three things that most annoy local people about foreign

tourists in Jordan are immodest dress, public displays of affection and lack of social respect. In this section we try to explain why, and how to avoid causing upset.

Read more: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/middle-east/jordan/culture-etiquette/#ixzz3V62MQ1nz

Read more: http://www.roughguides.com/gallery/destination/country/jordan/#ixzz3V665fpo1

http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/middle-east/jordan/things-miss/#/0

Distances are small in Jordan, and the landscapes are hugely varied. A couple of hours’ travel could see you losing or gaining hundreds of metres in altitude and moving in quick succession from village to city and forest to desert.

Read more: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/middle-east/jordan/itineraries/#ixzz3V66lMii6

The Medical Tourism Association in partnership with the Private Hospitals Association (PHA) announces the Jordan Health and Wellness Destination Guide.

The author of the guide – President and founder of the Medical Tourism Association; Editor In Chief of Medical Tourism Magazine – Renée-Marie Stephano, said: “This book aims not only at consumers, but also the employers, insurance companies and other buyers of healthcare from all countries in the world.”

As part of our continuing Series on Medical Tourism, Health and Wellness, the Jordan Destination Guide is a “how-to” guide for individuals and employers seeking to learn about the health and wellness opportunities that exist throughout Jordan. Known for years for its excellence in healthcare, Jordan has continually increased its value proposition by promoting quality and international standards. Jordan’s strength lies in the high quality of its health care professionals within the medical services sector.
http://www.medicaltourismassociation.com/en/press/jordan-to-release-its-health-and-wellness-destinat.html

Your experience of Jordanian people is likely to be that they are, almost without exception, decent, honest, respectful and courteous. It seems only right that you should return some of that respect by showing a grasp of some basic aspects of Jordanian, Arab and Muslim culture.

If it’s possible to generalize, the three things that most annoy local people about foreign tourists in Jordan are immodest dress, public displays of affection and lack of social respect. In this section we try to explain why, and how to avoid causing upset.

Read more: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/middle-east/jordan/culture-etiquette/#ixzz3V62MQ1nz

On the Jordanian side, the Dead Sea is possible as a day trip from both Amman and Aqaba. The road is a good dual carriage way. Tourist areas are accessible from the main road that runs along the eastern side of the body of water and connects to Jordan’s Desert Highway running to Amman.

Highways leading to the Dead Sea are clearly marked by brown tourist signs. It is an ambitious 3-hour drive from Aqaba in southern Jordan. [Wiki]

#8) Experience the Middle East (Without the Danger)

Many friends and family couldn’t believe I was heading to the middle east when I did. All you hear on the news is about how dangerous it is over there.  The reality? It is pretty dangerous over there, but NOT in Jordan.  Jordan is a bit of a safe haven from the violence going on in surrounding countries.

Jordan is on friendly terms with everyone that surrounds them, making it the safest destination to travel to in the middle east.  Based on my experience there, I can totally back this up.  Regardless of where we went I never felt unsafe, and in fact felt much more comfortable than many other places I’ve visited.

So if this has been a concern for you and is a reason why you haven’t ventured out into that part of the world, you should definitely reconsider.

– See more at: http://www.seanogle.com/travel/10-reasons-to-visit-jordan#sthash.4NkA3IEl.dpuf

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